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Many people enjoy having a pet rabbit as a part of their family. However, some dogs may see these small creatures as prey and attack them. If you have a dog that is prone to attacking rabbits, there are steps you can take to train them not to do so. In this article, we will discuss how to train your dog basic obedience commands and the “leave it” command. We will also provide tips on what to do if your dog does attack a rabbit.

Distract him with the ‘look’ command, then reward him. Keeping the same distance from the rabbit, step to a new spot, and again get the dog’s attention. Reward him and then step away from the rabbit and give the dog lots of praise. The aim is to break the link between rabbits and chasing, and instead focus on you.

How to Train a Dog Not to Attack Rabbits

Dogs that are bred to hunt, such as terriers, may instinctively go after rabbits. However, with proper training, these dogs can be taught not to attack rabbits. The first step is to make sure your dog knows basic obedience commands such as “sit,” “stay,” and “come.” You will also need to be consistent with your commands and rewards. If your dog does not listen to basic commands, it will be much harder to train them not to attack rabbits.

How to train a dog not to attack rabbits

Next, you’ll need to start working on the “leave it” command. This is a command that tells your dog to leave something alone and can be used for many different things, including prey animals. To teach this command, start by putting a treat in your hand and holding it out to your dog. As soon as they take a bite of the treat, close your hand shut and say “leave it.” If your dog does not try to snatch the treat out of your hand, give them a verbal reward such as “good boy” or “good girl.” Once your dog understands the command, start putting the treat on the ground and say “leave it.” If your dog tries to take the treat, say “no” and pull your hand away. After a few repetitions, your dog should understand that they are not allowed to take the treat until you say it’s okay.

Introduce basic obedience commands

If you want to train your dog not to attack rabbits, it is important to start with basic obedience commands. Dogs that know how to “sit,” “stay,” and “come” are much easier to train than those that do not. You will need to be consistent with your commands and rewards in order to properly train your dog. If your dog does not listen to basic commands, it will be much harder to get them to stop attacking rabbits.

Teach the “leave it” command

The “leave it” command is a very important command to teach your dog. This command tells your dog to leave something alone and can be used for many different things, including prey animals. To teach this command, start by putting a treat in your hand and holding it out to your dog. As soon as they take a bite of the treat, close your hand shut and say “leave it.” If your dog does not try to snatch the treat out of your hand, give them a verbal reward such as “good boy” or “good girl.” Once your dog understands the command, start putting the treat on the ground and say “leave it.” If your dog tries to take the treat, say “no” and pull your hand away. After a few repetitions, your dog should understand that they are not allowed to take the treat until you say it’s okay.

Tips for what to do if your dog does attack a rabbit

If your dog does attack a rabbit, there are a few things you can do to help. First, try to distract your dog with a command or by throwing a toy. If that doesn’t work, try to scare your dog away by making loud noises or throwing objects at them. If all else fails, you may have to resort to physical force and put your dog in a choke hold until they release the rabbit. It is important to remember that these methods should only be used as a last resort, as they can be dangerous for both you and your dog.

FAQs

How do I get my dog used to a rabbit?

When making the initial introduction, leave the rabbit in its cage where it feels safe. Bring the dog to the rabbit’s hutch after he has eaten and has exercised, as this should be when he is at his calmest. Praise the dog and reward it with treats for remaining calm and not scaring the rabbit.

How do you train a dog to be around rabbits?

Introduce Them Slowly: Do not introduce the dog and rabbit hastily. The rabbit will have been placed in its cage in the neutral space ahead of time. Bring the dog into the space slowly and allow the dog to investigate the rabbit in its crate – visually and through smell.

Will dogs attack rabbits?

As small, vulnerable animals, baby rabbits are easy to catch and kill and often find themselves as a canine’s main catch. Many dog breeds were once working dogs used for hunting bunnies to keep rabbit populations under control. This means dogs have retained their predatory instincts from their hunting days.

Are rabbits scared of dogs?

Rabbits have been known to die of fright, being scared to death in their cages by dogs, raccoons, even raptors overhead.

How do I get my dog to stop barking at rabbits?

Exercise your dog so that he is tired and ready for quiet time. Expose your dog to your rabbit while your rabbit is in the cage on the floor. Praise calm behavior, correct aggressive or excited behavior. Once your dog is calm around your rabbit in the cage, have your dog lie down next to the cage door on his side.

What happens if a dog bites a rabbit?

Any bite wound to a rabbit from a dog or cat (or any predator) requires immediate attention. Carnivores have bacteria that reside in their oral cavity that can cause life-threatening infection in your rabbit if he is bitten.

Can you keep a dog and a rabbit together?

Domestic rabbits and dogs can live together. However, this requires bonding the two animals through consistent exposure in a safe environment. This will train your canine to resist its hunting instincts when around the rabbit. If possible, you should also choose a dog with a low prey drive.

Why is my dog licking my rabbit?

It is an excellent sign if the dog is doing so in a very gentle manner, exhibiting awareness of the fragility of the rabbit. The dog may greet the rabbit with a friendly lick or just look on cautiously if the dog is on the skittish side.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article has taught you how to train your dog not to attack rabbits. It is important to be patient and consistent when training your dog. If you are having trouble, seek the help of a professional trainer. Thank you for reading!